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Take a seat, you are now in the village square. Enjoy!
Runnin’ the River by Trish Nicholson

  In collaboration with Trish Nicholson, the New Zealander author of A Biography of Story, A Brief History of Humanity, we will be publishing a three-part coaching series on “the use of voice in storytelling” – which is intended to help writers of fiction navigate and master how voice and dialogue is used to capture the attention of their readers. As a prelude to this, we have decided to publish this flash story, Runnin’ the River which is mentioned…

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Flirting With Khartoum: A Ghazal

    In this poem, Ahmad Holderness pens an ode to the Sudanese ancient city of Khartoum   Who are you now City where love reared herself a throne molded From dust   Blue and white skirts flow to the nape of your waist, inviting Snake on a desert; I’m a pattern in your dust   Mud house, melting like a pillar of salt, with stars Gazing from behind heaven’s tears, I become stardust   A boy begged for…

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Portrait of an Astronomer Observing the Night Sky from St. Catherine’s, Sinai

      Iskandar Haggarty’s exclusively stylistic poem sheds light into the known and the unknown, questioning their effect on human feelings and nature.    perhaps it’s Salah El Din and perhaps not. perhaps the king Ptolemy and the scholar Ptolemy were brothers.       perhaps the mother of the night sky sheds her silken dress like comets falling as letters, inscribing lovelorn dunes. perhaps   the astronomer asks questions he’s not supposed to ask. perhaps the astronomer falls…

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The Separation Wall by Helon Habila

    1.THE WALL In history and in literature, walls have always appealed to the popular imagination. In his short story “The Great Wall of China,” Kafka shows this abiding popularity of walls using the example of the building of the wall in China. The wall was ostensibly built as protection against “raiders from the north.” It took many generations over many dynasties to build, and it involved the entire Chinese nation, making the people who actually engaged in…

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Powerful Women: From Fiction to Fact by Trish Nicholson

    The world is happy to celebrate powerful women – as long as they are fictional. From the Greeks’ mythical Amazons and the Valkyries of Icelandic sagas, to Wonder Woman striding heroically across our cinema screens, powerful women are the stuff of fantasy, the exception. But women have always been brave, smart, resourceful, strong – it’s the narratives that changed – and new findings are revealing women’s power as fact. The recent discovery by modern genome research, that…

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